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"Invasive Computing" (InvasIC)


In the Transregional Collaborative Research Center Invasive Computing (abbr. InvasIC), we are investigating a completely novel paradigm for designing and programming future parallel computing systems called invasive computing.
InvasIC is funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft for initially four years (July 2010 - July 2014) and aggregates researchers from three excellent sites in Germany (Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, Technische Universität München). This scientific team includes specialists in algorithm engineering for parallel algorithm design, hardware architects for reconfigurable MPSoC development as well as language, tool and application, and operating system designers.

The Idea of Invasive Computing

The main idea and novelty of invasive computing is to introduce resource-aware programming support in the sense that a given program gets the ability to explore and dynamically spread its computations to neighbour processors similar to a phase of invasion, then to execute portions of code of high parallelism degree in parallel based on the available (invasible) region on a given multi-processor architecture. Afterwards, once the program terminates or if the degree of parallelism should be lower again, the program may enter a retreat phase, deallocate resources and resume execution again, for example, sequentially on a single processor. To support this idea of self-adaptive and resource-aware programming new programming concepts, languages, compilers and operating systems are necessary as well as architectural changes in the design of MPSoCs (Multi-Processor Systems-on-a-Chip) to efficiently support invasion, infection and retreat operations by involving concepts for dynamic processor, interconnect and memory reconfiguration. Decreasing feature sizes have already led to a rethinking in the design of multi-million transistor system-on-chip (SoC) architectures, envisioning dramatically increasing rates of temporary and permanent faults and feature variations. The major question will be how to deal with this imperfect world in which components will become more and more unreliable. As we can foresee SoCs with 1000 or more processors on a single chip in the year 2020, static and central management concepts to control the execution of all resources might have met their limits long before and are therefore not appropriate. Invasion might provide the required self-organising behaviour to conventional programs for being able to provide scalability, higher resource utilisation numbers and, hopefully, also performance gains by adjusting the amount of allocated resources to the temporal needs of a running application. This thought opens a new way of thinking about parallel algorithm design. Based on algorithms utilising invasion and negotiating resources with others, we can imagine that corresponding programs become personalised objects, competing with other applications running simultaneously on an MPSoC.

Scientific Goals of InvasIC

In the Transregional Collaborative Research Center InvasIC, we provide the necessary extensions to support invasive programming efficiently by introducing and investigating new concepts of dynamic and resource-aware programming as well as required new architectural processor, interconnect and memory structures providing the necessary extensions to support invasive programming efficiently -- in particular through concepts of dynamic hardware reconfiguration. Legacy programs shall still be executable within an invasive computing architecture, thus we will show a migration path from traditional programming to the new invasive programming paradigm. We believe that only a Transregional Collaborative Research Center aggregating the best researchers from three excellent sites in Germany will allow us to investigate these revolutionary ideas. Our InvasIC researching team includes specialists in algorithm engineering for parallel algorithm design, hardware architects for reconfigurable MPSoC development as well as language, tool and application and operating system designers. Invasive computing is the central theme of InvasIC that can be found in each project. A carefully worked out validation concept with an FPGA-based demonstrator has been proposed in order to fully demonstrate the benefits of invasive computing quantitatively.

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